Exotic Pet Wonderland

Crab-Eating Raccoons

Content Image
A stock photo of a crab-eating raccoons standing on a rock in front of a pond
Raccoon Classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Mammalia
Order: Carnivora
Family:  Procyonidae
Genus: Procyon
Species: Cancrivorus
Scientific Name

Procyon Cancrivorus

Conservation status

Least Concern

LIFE SPAN

Unknown, but it can be assumed the lifespan of a crab-eating raccoon is similar to that of a common raccoon

2-3 years in the wild

up to 20 years in captivity

Body size

7-20 lbs
9-12 inches at the shoulder

Native habitat

Crab-eating raccoons are native to Central and South America. Unlike common raccoons, crab-eating raccoons are less likely to be found in human environments. Usually they are found ear water, and live most of their lives in trees. 

Diet

As their name suggestscrab-eating raccoons eat a diet of crab, lobster, crayfish, other crustaceans and shellfish. They are still omnivores though, so they will also eat eggs, fruits, and even small amphibians.

Rad Raccoon Facts!

Crab-eating raccoons are sympatric with Common Raccoons. Animals are considered sympatric when they are two closely related species that live in the same area and regularly encounter one another.  

There are four subspecies of Crab-Eating raccoon

Raccoons have four, or even five times more sensory cells in their hands compared to most other mammals. 

 

 
 
Crab-Eating Raccoons have evolved to fit their habitat

Crab-eating raccoons are native to Central and South America. They resemble the common raccoon with their bandit mask and ringed tail. Unlike the common raccoon though, the hair on the nape of the neck points towards the head, rather than backward. 

As their name suggests, crab-eating raccoons eat a diet of crab, lobster, crayfish, other crustaceans and shellfish. They are still omnivores though, so they will also eat eggs, fruits, and even small amphibians.

Crab-eating raccoons have adapted a more arboreal lifestyle than the common raccoon, with sharper, narrower claws. They also appear to have a more streamlined body than the common raccoon due to their shorter fur and more gracile build, although they are similar in size. 

Unlike common raccoons, crab-eating raccoons are less likely to be found in human environments. Usually they are found ear water, and live most of their lives in trees. 

Crab-eating raccoons will breed between July and September, and will have their kits in crevices, hollow trees, or abandoned nests from other animals. Like common raccoons, males have no part in raising their young.